Waiting on Wednesday: How to Hang a Witch

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Waiting on Wednesday is hosted by Jill at Breaking the Spine, and spotlights upcoming releases that we’re eagerly anticipating. This week I picked: 

Math_9780553539479_jkt_all_r1.inddHow to Hang a Witch (How to Hang a Witch #1) by Adriana Mather

Details: Hardcover, 368 pages
Expected publication: July 26th 2016 by Knopf Books for Young Readers
Buy it: Book Depository

Summary: For fans of Conversion and Mean Girls, comes a debut novel where the trials of high school start to feel like a modern day witch hunt for a teen with all the wrong connections to Salem’s past.

Salem, Massachusetts is the site of the infamous witch trials and the new home of Samantha Mather. Recently transplanted from New York City, Sam and her stepmother are not exactly welcomed with open arms. Sam is the descendant of Cotton Mather, one of the men responsible for those trials and almost immediately, she becomes the enemy of a group of girls who call themselves The Descendants. And guess who their ancestors were?
If dealing with that weren’t enough, Sam also comes face to face with a real live (well technically dead) ghost. A handsome, angry ghost who wants Sam to stop touching his stuff. But soon Sam discovers she is at the center of a centuries old curse affecting anyone with ties to the trials. Sam must come to terms with the ghost and find a way to work with the Descendants to stop a deadly cycle that has been going on since the first accused witch was hanged. If any town should have learned its lesson, it’s Salem. But history may be about to repeat itself.

Review: What We Hide

What We Hide Marthe JocelynWhat We Hide by Marthe Jocelyn

Publication Date: October 13th 2015 (first published April 2nd 2014)
Details: Paperback, 288 pages
Publisher: Tundra Books
ISBN: 9781770496439
Source: I won a copy from LibraryThing.

Marthe Jocelyn:
Website | Goodreads

Buy What We Hide:
Amazon | Book Depository

SUMMARY

Jenny and her brother Tom are off to England. Tom to university to dodge the Vietnam draft, Jenny to be the new girl at Illington Hall, which the students call Ill Hall. This is Jenny’s chance to finally be special and stand out, so when she arrives she tells everybody a lie. But in the small world of Ill Hall, everyone has secrets. Jenny pretends she has a boyfriend. Robbie and Luke pretend they don’t. Brenda won’t tell what happened with the school doctor. Percy won’t tell about his famous dad. Oona lies to everyone. Penelope lies only to herself. Deftly told from multiple points of view in various narrative styles, including letters and movie screenplays, What We Hide is a provocative, honest, often funny and always intriguing look at secrets.

REVIEW

I won a copy of this book from LibraryThing and I meant to get to it right away, but I just didn’t get the chance. Which is probably a good thing. It took me a really long time to get through this book. If I would have tried reading it when I got it (I was sick), I probably wouldn’t have finished it. That would have drove me crazy. I don’t think I’ve ever not finished a book. I might put them down for a bit, but I always go back to them. This one, I don’t think I would have picked back up.

What We Hide wasn’t horrible, it’s probably an okay read. It just wasn’t for me. I really didn’t enjoy it, and I couldn’t wait to finish it. I just wanted to be done with it. I found it incredibly boring, because nothing really happens. To be completely honest, I actually fell asleep in the car while reading it. I was so bored that I was having trouble staying awake, and I wasn’t even reading in bed. I was in the car! I also found Jenny’s chapters annoying. I understand that she’s an American, that she is now going to school in England, and she was learning new words. Every single time it said something meant something, I wanted to throw the book across the room.

“Great jumper!” Penelope ran her fingers along my newly fluffed hem.
Jumper means “sweater.” – Page 20

“I dunno how you ever snogged either of them.” said Kirsten. Snog means “kiss.” – Page 21

For where to send it, I had to ring Tom.
Ring means “call.” – Page 118

It was clear by day two that the maths they were learning in England (maths means “math”) was far beyond what we’d been doing in the States… – Page 120

I really wanted to like this one. Obviously when you start a book, you want to enjoy it. For me, I wanted to like it because the author lives near me, and I find that kind of awesome. Unfortunately I found it boring, and Jenny’s chapters were super annoying. This one just wasn’t for me, but I will give Marthe Jocelyn another try. I’ve wanted to read Folly for years. I will give that one a read someday. However, I don’t think I will be running out to buy it anytime soon.

1 OUT OF 5 STARS