Stacking the Shelves

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Stacking The Shelves is hosted by Tynga’s Reviews.

Yesterday I  went to the city with my mom and my cousin and when we picked up my cousin, the very first thing she said to me was that she had a surprise for me. She surprised me with books. One of them is signed and the other one she knew was on my wish list. 🙂

Books I Didn’t Get Myself:

I Bought At Goodwill:

 

 

Review: Monkey Mind: A Memoir of Anxiety by Daniel B. Smith

Monkey Mind: A Memoir of Anxiety Daniel B. SmithMonkey Mind: A Memoir of Anxiety by Daniel B. Smith

Publication Date: July 3rd 2012
Details: Hardcover, 212 pages
Publisher: Simon & Schuster
ISBN: 9781439177303
Source: My mom bought it for me. 🙂

Buy Monkey Mind: A Memoir of Anxiety:
Amazon | Book Depository

Summary

Daniel Smith’s Monkey Mind is the stunning articulation of what it is like to live with anxiety. As he travels through anxiety’s demonic layers, Smith defangs the disorder with great humor and evocatively expresses its self-destructive absurdities and painful internal coherence. Aaron Beck, the most influential doctor in modern psychotherapy, says that “Monkey Mind does for anxiety what William Styron’s Darkness Visible did for depression.” Neurologist and bestselling writer Oliver Sacks says, “I read Monkey Mind with admiration for its bravery and clarity….I broke out into explosive laughter again and again.” Here, finally, comes relief and recognition to all those who want someone to put what they feel, or what their loved ones feel, into words.

Review

This is not an easy review for me to write. How exactly do you review a memoir? I guess I will just make this somewhat short.

I have really bad anxiety. I had to drop out of school, I can’t work, I live with my dad and I have no friends. I can’t do much for myself. To be honest, even blogging is difficult for me most times. When it comes to my life, anxiety is in complete control. So when I first heard about this memoir, I knew I had to read it.

It was a good read. I flew through it. It even made me laugh out loud a few times. It was nice to finally see what anxiety is like for someone else. However, I have to admit that I wasn’t blown away.

If you want a memoir that you can read in a couple of hours, you might want to check this one out. It was good, just not as amazing as I was hoping it would be.

3 out of 5 stars

It’s Monday! What Are You Reading?

It's Monday! What Are You Reading

It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? is hosted by The Book Date.

Read Last Week: 

Wild Hunt (Evie Scelan #2) Margaret RonaldSoul Hunt (Evie Scelan #3) Margaret Ronald

Currently Reading:

Monkey Mind: A Memoir of AnxietyMonkey Mind: A Memoir of Anxiety Daniel B. Smith by Daniel B. Smith

Synopsis: Daniel Smith’s Monkey Mind is the stunning articulation of what it is like to live with anxiety. As he travels through anxiety’s demonic layers, Smith defangs the disorder with great humor and evocatively expresses its self-destructive absurdities and painful internal coherence. Aaron Beck, the most influential doctor in modern psychotherapy, says that “Monkey Mind does for anxiety what William Styron’s Darkness Visible did for depression.” Neurologist and bestselling writer Oliver Sacks says, “I read Monkey Mind with admiration for its bravery and clarity….I broke out into explosive laughter again and again.” Here, finally, comes relief and recognition to all those who want someone to put what they feel, or what their loved ones feel, into words.

Wishlist Wednesday: Hunger Makes Me a Modern Girl

Wishlist Wednesday

Wishlist Wednesday is hosted by Pen to Paper.

Hunger Makes Me a Modern Girl Carrie BrownsteinHunger Makes Me a Modern Girl by Carrie Brownstein

Details: Hardcover, 256 pages
Published: October 27th 2015 by Riverhead Books
Buy it: Book Depository

Synopsis: From a leader of feminist punk music at the dawn of the riot-grrrl era, a candid and deeply personal look at life in rock and roll.

Before Carrie Brownstein codeveloped and starred in the wildly popular TV comedy Portlandia, she was already an icon to young women for her role as a musician in the feminist punk band Sleater-Kinney. The band was a key part of the early riot- grrrl and indie rock scenes in the Pacific Northwest, known for their prodigious guitar shredding and their leftist lyrics against war, traditionalism, and gender roles.

Hunger Makes Me a Modern Girl is the deeply personal and revealing narrative of Brownstein’s life in music, from ardent fan to pioneering female guitarist to comedic performer and luminary in the independent rock world. Though Brownstein struggled against the music industry’s sexist double standards, by 2006 she was the only woman to earn a spot on Rolling Stone readers’ list of the “25 Most Underrated Guitarists of All-Time.” This book intimately captures what it feels like to be a young woman in a rock-and-roll band, from her days at the dawn of the underground feminist punk-rock movement that would define music and pop culture in the 1990s through today.

Stacking The Shelves

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Stacking The Shelves is hosted by Tynga’s Reviews.

I know my mom buys me a lot of books, but the last few weeks have been crazy. I don’t usually get books every single week so this isn’t a normal thing. I don’t think I will be getting anymore for awhile. Most of the books I got this week were from Goodwill. It’s one of my favorite places to go and we don’t get there that often. So thanks mom for buying me even more books. lol She’s the best.

From The Bookstore: 

Just Kids Patti Smith The Moonstone Wilkie CollinsAncillary Sword (Imperial Radch #2) Ann LeckieRat Queens, Vol. 1: Sass & Sorcery Kurtis J. Wiebe Roc Upchurch

From Goodwill: 

The Hollows Insider (The Hollows #9.5) Kim HarrisonThe Golden Compass (His Dark Materials #1) Philip PullmanThe Subtle Knife (His Dark Materials #2) Philip PullmanThe Amber Spyglass (His Dark Materials #3) Philip PullmanThe Warded Man (The Demon Cycle #1) Peter V. BrettMagician: Apprentice (The Riftwar Saga #1) Raymond E. FeistMagician: Master (The Riftwar Saga #2) Raymond E. Feist

The Space Between Brenna YovanoffAscendant (Killer Unicorns #2) Diana PeterfreundLord of Misrule (The Morganville Vampires #5) Rachel CaineStation Eleven Emily St. John MandelRedshirts John ScalziConsider Phlebas (Culture #1) Iain M. BanksElizabeth: The Struggle for the Throne David StarkeyA Tale for the Time Being Ruth OzekiSwamplandia! Karen RussellMonkey Mind: A Memoir of Anxiety Daniel B. SmithWithout You: A Memoir of Love, Loss, and the Musical Rent Anthony Rapp

Waiting on Wednesday: You’re Never Weird on the Internet – Almost

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Waiting on Wednesday is hosted by Jill at Breaking the Spine, and spotlights upcoming releases that we’re eagerly anticipating. This week I picked: 


23705512You’re Never Weird on the Internet – Almost by Felicia Day

Details: Hardcover, 272 pages
Expected publication: August 11th 2015 by Touchstone
Pre-order: Book Depository

Summary: From online entertainment mogul, actress, and “queen of the geeks” Felicia Day, a funny, quirky, and inspiring memoir about her unusual upbringing, her rise to Internet-stardom, and embracing her individuality to find success in Hollywood.

The Internet isn’t all cat videos. There’s also Felicia Day—violinist, filmmaker, Internet entrepreneur, compulsive gamer, hoagie specialist, and former lonely homeschooled girl who overcame her isolated childhood to become the ruler of a new world…or at least semi-influential in the world of Internet Geeks and Goodreads book clubs.

After growing up in the south where she was “homeschooled for hippie reasons”, Felicia moved to Hollywood to pursue her dream of becoming an actress and was immediately typecast as a crazy cat-lady secretary. But Felicia’s misadventures in Hollywood led her to produce her own web series, own her own production company, and become an Internet star.

Felicia’s short-ish life and her rags-to-riches rise to Internet fame launched her career as one of the most influential creators in new media. Now, Felicia’s strange world is filled with thoughts on creativity, video games, and a dash of mild feminist activism—just like her memoir.

Hilarious and inspirational, You’re Never Weird on the Internet (Almost) is proof that everyone should embrace what makes them different and be brave enough to share it with the world, because anything is possible now—even for a digital misfit.