Review: What We Hide

What We Hide Marthe JocelynWhat We Hide by Marthe Jocelyn

Publication Date: October 13th 2015 (first published April 2nd 2014)
Details: Paperback, 288 pages
Publisher: Tundra Books
ISBN: 9781770496439
Source: I won a copy from LibraryThing.

Marthe Jocelyn:
Website | Goodreads

Buy What We Hide:
Amazon | Book Depository

SUMMARY

Jenny and her brother Tom are off to England. Tom to university to dodge the Vietnam draft, Jenny to be the new girl at Illington Hall, which the students call Ill Hall. This is Jenny’s chance to finally be special and stand out, so when she arrives she tells everybody a lie. But in the small world of Ill Hall, everyone has secrets. Jenny pretends she has a boyfriend. Robbie and Luke pretend they don’t. Brenda won’t tell what happened with the school doctor. Percy won’t tell about his famous dad. Oona lies to everyone. Penelope lies only to herself. Deftly told from multiple points of view in various narrative styles, including letters and movie screenplays, What We Hide is a provocative, honest, often funny and always intriguing look at secrets.

REVIEW

I won a copy of this book from LibraryThing and I meant to get to it right away, but I just didn’t get the chance. Which is probably a good thing. It took me a really long time to get through this book. If I would have tried reading it when I got it (I was sick), I probably wouldn’t have finished it. That would have drove me crazy. I don’t think I’ve ever not finished a book. I might put them down for a bit, but I always go back to them. This one, I don’t think I would have picked back up.

What We Hide wasn’t horrible, it’s probably an okay read. It just wasn’t for me. I really didn’t enjoy it, and I couldn’t wait to finish it. I just wanted to be done with it. I found it incredibly boring, because nothing really happens. To be completely honest, I actually fell asleep in the car while reading it. I was so bored that I was having trouble staying awake, and I wasn’t even reading in bed. I was in the car! I also found Jenny’s chapters annoying. I understand that she’s an American, that she is now going to school in England, and she was learning new words. Every single time it said something meant something, I wanted to throw the book across the room.

“Great jumper!” Penelope ran her fingers along my newly fluffed hem.
Jumper means “sweater.” – Page 20

“I dunno how you ever snogged either of them.” said Kirsten. Snog means “kiss.” – Page 21

For where to send it, I had to ring Tom.
Ring means “call.” – Page 118

It was clear by day two that the maths they were learning in England (maths means “math”) was far beyond what we’d been doing in the States… – Page 120

I really wanted to like this one. Obviously when you start a book, you want to enjoy it. For me, I wanted to like it because the author lives near me, and I find that kind of awesome. Unfortunately I found it boring, and Jenny’s chapters were super annoying. This one just wasn’t for me, but I will give Marthe Jocelyn another try. I’ve wanted to read Folly for years. I will give that one a read someday. However, I don’t think I will be running out to buy it anytime soon.

1 OUT OF 5 STARS

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It’s Monday! What Are You Reading?

It's Monday! What Are You Reading

It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? is hosted by The Book Date.

Read Last Two Weeks:

Burning Embers Hannah FieldingMy Last Continent Midge RaymondStrain of Resistance Michelle Bryan

Currently Reading:

Dark Ages: 2020 (Dark Ages #1)Dark Ages 2020 J.D. Dutra by J.D. Dutra

Synopsis: No civilization has ever stood the test of time. When societies collapse… How do the unprepared survive?

After ancient Rome fell to the barbarian hordes and its light went out, 500 years of economic and cultural deterioration followed in Europe – The Dark Ages. In the 14th century, the most brutal pandemic to ravage mankind finally pulled this part of the world out of the darkness. The Black Death decimated over 60% of the population, creating an immediate surplus of goods and land, which catapulted Europe into a new age of the rebirth: The Renaissance.

The Black Death pandemic of the 14th century was no act of nature. The outbreak was unleashed on purpose, by an ancient and occult cabal which still operates at the present time, behind the secret societies of the rich and powerful.

In the year 2020, moved by the desire to launch humanity into a new era of enlightenment and scientific advancements, this same obscure society plans to release a virus which can wipe out up to 90% of the world’s population. Political maneuvering and the biggest false flag event in generations sets their plan in motion, and immediately the President of The United States is caught in a web of horror weaved by this powerful global elite.

In the midst of it all, a clandestine CIA agent is torn between honor, duty and family. A struggling entrepreneur obeys the State and yet pays the ultimate price. An influential philanthropist has a dark secret that can alter the course of history, one which might lead a trio of scam artists to get more than they ever expected.

As modern society crumbles and the final unleashing of a New World Order takes place, these 5 lives will collide in a violent struggle for control, power and ultimate survival.

Sci-Fi Summer Read-a-Thon TBR

SciFiSummer2016

#SciFiSummerJune – Sign up here.

I will most likely start with God Emperor of Dune. I love this series and I really want to get back into it. The Star Wars book is the last one in the Thrawn Trilogy, so it would be nice to finish that off. I would also really like to get to Janus since my dad got it for me years ago. I’m not sure if I will be able to read all three of these. My goal is the first two and Janus is there just in case I actually finish early and can squeeze another book in.

Waiting on Wednesday: Three Sisters, Three Queens

new-wow

Waiting on Wednesday is hosted by Jill at Breaking the Spine, and spotlights upcoming releases that we’re eagerly anticipating. This week I picked: 

Three Sisters Three Queens Tudor Court Philippa GregoryThree Sisters, Three Queens (The Tudor Court #2) by Philippa Gregory

Details: Hardcover, 464 pages
Expected publication: August 9th 2016 by Touchstone
Buy it: Book Depository

Summary: As sisters they share an everlasting bond; As queens they can break each other’s hearts.

“There is only one bond that I trust: between a woman and her sisters. We never take our eyes off each other. In love and in rivalry, we always think of each other.”

When Katherine of Aragon is brought to the Tudor court as a young bride, the oldest princess, Margaret, takes her measure. With one look, each knows the other for a rival, an ally, a pawn, destined—with Margaret’s younger sister Mary—to a sisterhood unique in all the world. The three sisters will become the queens of England, Scotland, and France.

United by family loyalties and affections, the three queens find themselves set against each other. Katherine commands an army against Margaret and kills her husband James IV of Scotland. But Margaret’s boy becomes heir to the Tudor throne when Katherine loses her son. Mary steals the widowed Margaret’s proposed husband, but when Mary is widowed it is her secret marriage for love that is the envy of the others. As they experience betrayals, dangers, loss, and passion, the three sisters find that the only constant in their perilous lives is their special bond, more powerful than any man, even a king.

It’s Monday! What Are You Reading?

It's Monday! What Are You Reading

It’s Monday! What Are You Reading? is hosted by The Book Date.

Read Last Week:

The Echoes of Love Hannah Fielding

Currently Reading:

Burning Embers Hannah FieldingBurning Embers by Hannah Fielding

Synopsis: After calling off her wedding, Coral Sinclair, a beautiful but naive young photographer, learns that she has also lost her father. Leaving the life she’s known in England, she sails to Kenya to take ownership of her inheritance – Mpingo, the plantation that was her childhood home. On the voyage, Coral meets a charismatic stranger and their mystifying attraction shakes her to the core. When she encounters him again days later near Mpingo, she is warned that the man is not to be trusted. Rafe de Monfort, owner of a nightclub and the neighbouring plantation, is not only a notorious womanizer but also entangled with Coral’s stepmother, which may have contributed to her father’s death – or so the rumours go.

Stacking The Shelves

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Stacking The Shelves is hosted by Tynga’s Reviews.

For My Birthday:

Doctor Who The Secret Lives of Monsters Justin RichardsDoctor Who: The Secret Lives of Monsters by Justin Richards

A unique, in-depth look into the hidden lives and mysteries of the monsters from the hit BBC series Doctor Who—a fully illustrated color compendium that reveals proof of the existence of alien life out there and among us, packaged with removable artwork commissioned exclusively for the book.

For years, world governments and multinational organizations like the secretive UNIT have suppressed the truth. In this book, leading alientologist Justin Richards finally blows the lid off the biggest conspiracy to radically alter our world since The Scarlioni Incident.

Not only is there proof that alien life exists. The aliens are already here. Based on exclusive access to classified UNIT and Torchwood files—shocking information that has been suppressed for centuries—The Secret Lives of Monsters reveals the terrifying truth behind the rumors and legends.

Packed with iconic photographs, eyewitness accounts, diagrams and illustrations, and sixteen removable color prints, The Secret Lives of Monsters offers background details on a diverse range of alien species—including planetary and genetic origins, habits, social organization, and first human contact. If you want to know why the Sontaran’s probic vent is his weak point or what it is used for; how Daleks reproduce; or how to determine whether your best friend is a Zygon, the answers—as well as everything you need to know to survive future invasions—are here in The Secret Lives of Monsters.

Goodreads Win:

The Assistants Camille PerriThe Assistants by Camille Perri

A wry and astute debut about a young Manhattanite whose embezzlement scam turns her into an unlikely advocate for the leagues of overeducated and underpaid assistants across the city.

Tina Fontana is the hapless but brazen thirty-year-old executive assistant to Robert Barlow, the all-powerful and commanding CEO of Titan Corp., a multinational media conglomerate. She’s excellent at her job and beloved by her famous boss—but after six years of making his reservations for restaurants she’d never get into on her own and pouring his drinks from bottles that cost more than her rent, she’s bored, broke, and just a bit over it all.

When a technical error with Robert’s travel-and-expenses report presents Tina with the opportunity to pay off the entire balance of her student loan debt with what would essentially be pocket change for her boss, she struggles with the decision: She’s always played by the rules. But it’s such a relatively small amount of money for the Titan Corporation—and for her it would be a life-changer . . .

The Assistants speaks directly to a new generation of women who feel stuck and unable to get ahead playing by the rules. It will appeal to all of those who have ever asked themselves, “How is it that after all these years, we are still assistants?”

 

Waiting on Wednesday: Katherine of Aragon, The True Queen

new-wow

Waiting on Wednesday is hosted by Jill at Breaking the Spine, and spotlights upcoming releases that we’re eagerly anticipating. This week I picked: 

Katherine of Aragon The True Queen Six Tudor Queens Alison WeirKatherine of Aragon, The True Queen: A Novel (Six Tudor Queens #1) by Alison Weir

Details: Hardcover, 624 pages
Expected publication: May 31st 2016 by Ballantine Books
Buy it: Book Depository

Summary: The lives of Henry VIII’s queens make for dramatic stories and Alison Weir will write a series of novels that offer insights into the real lives of the six wives based on extensive research and new theories.

In all the romancing, has anyone regarded the evidence that Anne Boleyn did not love Henry VIII? Or that Prince Arthur, Katherine of Aragon’s first husband, who is said to have loved her in fact cared so little for her that he willed his personal effects to his sister? Or that Henry VIII, an over-protected child and teenager, was prudish when it came to sex? That Jane Seymour, usually portrayed as Henry’s one true love, had the makings of a matriarch? There is much to reveal …

Alison will write about the wives in the context of their own age and of the court intrigues that surrounded these women and – without exception – wrecked their lives. She will transport readers into a lost and vivid world of splendour and brutality: a world in which love, or the game of it, dominates all.